Sat. May 25th, 2024



TLDR: Company Unveils New State-of-the-Art Heat Pump Technology

TLDR: This Will Be Uploaded to WordPress

The adoption of heat pumps has been growing, and Johnson Controls has developed a new state-of-the-art heat pump using a refrigerant with a lower global warming potential (GWP). The company’s “YVWH-200 Water-to-Water Variable Speed Dual Screw Heat Pump” has a combined coefficient of performance of 4.1 and the ability to heat water up to 80 degrees Celsius and chill water to five degrees Celsius. The pump cuts carbon pollution by 20% annually and is already available for purchase.

Key Points:

  • Johnson Controls has developed a new state-of-the-art heat pump using a refrigerant with a lower global warming potential (GWP) than other types.
  • The heat pump has a combined coefficient of performance of 4.1 and can heat water up to 80 degrees Celsius and chill water to five degrees Celsius.
  • Using the pump cuts carbon pollution linked to rising global temperatures by 20% annually.
  • The pump is already available for purchase, putting Johnson Controls ahead of the game in the transition to more planet-friendly technology.

Article Summary:

The adoption of heat pumps has been growing, and one company has given consumers yet another reason to be excited about the devices after unveiling its new state-of-the-art technology. Multinational conglomerate Johnson Controls has developed a first-of-its-kind heat pump using a refrigerant with a lower “global warming potential” (GWP) than other types. The “YVWH-200 Water-to-Water Variable Speed Dual Screw Heat Pump” has a combined coefficient of performance of 4.1, meaning that about four units of heat power are generated by each single unit of input power. Johnson Controls also stated that the pump is able to heat water up to 80 degrees Celsius and chill water to five degrees Celsius.

Using the pump cuts carbon pollution linked to rising global temperatures by 20% annually, according to the manufacturer’s website. Johnson Controls joined other companies in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Residential Cold Climate Heat Pump Technology Challenge, demonstrating a commitment to next-generation heat pump technology. Lennox International, Carrier, Trane Technologies, and Rheem have also been part of the initiative.

The new product from Johnson Controls is already available for purchase, making the company well ahead of the game as the U.S. looks to transition to more planet-friendly technology. The Environmental Protection Agency plans to start restricting the use of hydrofluorocarbons with higher GWPs starting next year. Todd Grabowski, the vice president and general manager of Applied Equipment at Johnson Controls, said that low-GWP refrigerants and the electrification of heating and cooling with heat pumps are two essential pieces of a successful sustainability strategy.

Related Post